Quince Roses Tartlets

Quince Roses Tartlets

Another quince recipe for all those who are lucky to have a quince tree or a shop nearby selling these wonderful fruits.

These cute tartlets with oriental touch of flavor are easy to prepare and are not as difficult as they seem.

I decided to use small quinces for this recipe as I found that smaller tartlets look more precious than bigger one and smaller slices fits well in them. A good way to use small fruits. I made use of 12 normal sized (top diameter 6 cm / 2 1/2 inches) silicon muffin mold.

Ingredients

For the crust

  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup ground almonds
  • 1/4 cup vegetal oil (olive oil if not too strong in taste)
  • 4 cardamom pods, seeds grinded
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup water, adjust quantity if necessary

For the quince roses

  • 8 small quinces (about 1 1/2 kg, 3 pounds)
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 4-6 teaspoons sugar, for topping

Directions

  1. Mix all the ingredient for the dough adding the water in small portions until the dough comes together. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  2. In the meantime prepare the quinces. Peel the quinces and cut the pulp into thin slices. I cut the slices tangentially so I don’t have to cut through the core. Discard the core.
  3. Put slice in a heavy saucepan, cover with sugar and water. Cook covered at low heat until the slices are pliable but nut mush. This takes about 10 minutes. Let cool down slightly to handle.
  4. Divide dough into 12 small balls.
  5. Roll out the balls on a floured surface making circles of about 6-7 cm and press on the walls of small muffin molds (only half of the walls high).
  6. Starting from the border of the muffin wall with dough, lay the slices of the quinces overlapping the edges slightly and form the roses.
  7. Sprinkle each rose with sugar.
  8. Bake 45 Minutes at 170°C or until the borders of the quinces become darker.
  9. Let cool down before serving. Keeps in the fridge 2-3 days!
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8 thoughts on “Quince Roses Tartlets

  1. What a lovely recipe. I’m lucky enough to have a quince tree and you can bet I’ll be trying this when the fruit is ripe next April in Australia. Yum, yum!

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