Italian Flat Bread with Sourdough Starter – Piadina al Licoli

This kind of flatbread is a very popular street food from the Italian region called “Emilia-Romagna” but now you can find it not only in Italy but in many other countries.

The original piadina is non-fermented bread prepared with lard, but in this version we will use the sourdough starter (perfect if you need to refresh it) and I will use olive oil instead of animal fat.

I can remember the piadine as streed food, filled with thin slices of prosciutto crudo or with cheese.

Today you may find all kind of piadinas, filled with many different ingredients but the most important thing is to enjoy it still warm, soft inside and crunchy outside.

My filling this time? Smoked salmon with a fresh guacamole sauce with chopped tomatoes. So good!

Italian Flat Bread with Sourdough Starter – Piadina al Licoli

  • Servings: 8 flatbreads
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

You need:

  • 100 g sourdough starter (100%) hydration
  • 120 g water
  • 300 g bread flour
  • 50 ml olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

 

Procedure:

  1. Dissolve the sourdough with the water, add flour add the other ingredients and knead well until combined and it comes together (use a kneading machine if you have it!). If necessary add a few more tablespoons water.
  2. Wrap with foil or cover with a bowl and lest rest at least 60 minutes.
  3. Cut into 6-8 slices and shape them into balls, place them on floured surface, cover with an inverted big bowl and let rise until when almost doubled.
  4. Roll out each ball to rounds of about 25 cm (10 inches). You will not need flour on the table.
  5. Put the rolled out piadine on a tray using parchment foil to separate them. Or prepare them one by one cooking them just after rolling each one out. Pinch each one with the fork all over the surface before cooking them.
  6. Now heat up your non-stick skillet to medium high. Don’t add any kind of oil or fat!
  7. Bake dry on the first side, when well roasted, flip it and bake the other side. The piadina should be pale, but with dark brown spots. Be careful not to burn it. During baking if necessary pinch them and turn them with the fork. In about 3-4 minutes they should be ready.

Tip: I have two old nonstick pans that I reserved for this recipe or to roast nuts. I use both at the same time!

Autor: https://artandkitchen.wordpress.com/

 

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Spelt Injera – Ethiopian Flatbread

 

I came across Ethiopian recipes and especially this wonderful breads thanks to my cooking friends and the cooking games.

I’ve never been in this Country and I couldn’t imagine what kind of food specialties are popular in Ethiopia.

The real recipe is made with teff flour, but as I did not have this I tried to adapt the recipe to the ingredients I have at home.

Injera bread is made with natural sourdough, a combination of wild yeast and bacteria, it needs several days to reach the bubbling point!

In my fridge I always store an amazing sourdough starter and this was a new experience for me a new kind of bread even if similar to Indian Dosas which I’ve already made and posted in this blog.

After cooking I got amazing flexible and spongy flat.-bread!

I was very impressed from the result and happy to see how my family appreciated these.

If you don’t have sourdough starter, I suggest to use 50 ml water + 50 g flour + 1/2 teaspoon instant dry yeast placed to ferment/proof previously

Spelt Injera – Ethiopian Flatbread

  • Servings: 6
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

You need

24 hour before

  • 100 g sourdough starter (substitute: 1/4 cup water + 1/3 cup flour + 1/2 teaspoon instant dry yeast)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour

Next morning

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 cup whole spelt flour
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • Salt to taste (about 1/2 tablespoon)
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour (instant flour)

Procedure

  1. The evening before combine starter with water and flour. Stir well, cover loosely and set in a warm place to ferment.
  2. The next morning add 2 cups of water 1 cup of all-purpose flour and 1 cup of spelt flour, stir well, cover loosely and let ferment.
  3. When the batter is well fermented and bubbling add salt and the additional 1/2 cup of flour, if you think it is not ready, wait until next day or add instant flour or some baking powder, My dough was perfectly spongy and I added simple all-purpose flour. Stir well.
  4. After about one hour stir well and place a non-sticky skillet on the stove to heat at medium temperature.
  5. Don’t use oil, place a ladle of batter in the center of the skillet and with the back of the ladle distribute the batter in the pan. Cover immediately.
  6. Check from time to time and when the batter does not appear wet and it is set remove the bread form the skillet and place it on a plate. In general it is not necessary to bake this on the other side.
  7. Cut into half and roll them to serve.

Autor: https://artandkitchen.wordpress.com/

Piadine Romagnole (Italian Flatbread)

piadine romagnole

A very popular flatbread from the Italian region called “Emilia-Romagna” usually made with flour, lard or olive oil.

Today this recipe is widespread all around the globe and has been adapted to the available ingredients.

Piadina means small “piada”; piada like the Greek word “pida” are flatbreads. The dough of this flatbread is not fermented (no yeast addition), but today the addition of baking powder is very common. Similar arcaic recipes can be found in India (Chapatty), in Mexico (Tortilla), Turkey (pide) and all around the world. Apparently the original recipe included lard, but today olive oil is widely used for this recipe as a mixture between water and milk instead of only milk (for softer result).

My father brought this recipe into my family and we love to prepare this again and again in his honor as well.

This bread needs to be eaten still warm, filled with “prosciutto crudo” (for example Parma ham), cheese, rucola or many other ingredients. Fold the warm piadina and fill it with your favorite ingredients.

You need

  • 500 g flour (4 cups)
  • 75 olive oil (1/3 cup, original recipe with rendered lard but I use olive oil only)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 100 ml milk (1/2 cup and 1 tablespoon)
  • 100 ml water (1/2 cup and 1 tablespoon)

Preparation

  1. Combine all the upper ingredients in a big bowl and knead well combined and it comes together. If necessary add a few tablespoons water. For this bread I use a kneading machine as it’s faster and easier.
  2. Wrap with foil or cover with a bowl and lest rest at least 60 minutes.
  3. Cut into 8 slices and shape them into balls.
  4. Roll out each ball to rounds of about 25 cm (10 inches). You will not need flour on the table.
  5. Put the rolled out piadine on a tray using parchment foil to separate them.
  6. Now heat up your nonstick skillet or an old non sticking fry pan to medium high. Don’t add any kind of oil or fat!
  7. Bake dry on the first side, check the underside, and when it looks done, flip it and bake the other side. The piadina should be pale, but with dark brown spots. Be careful not to burn it. During baking pinch them and roll them with the fork. In about 3-4 minutes they should be ready.
  8. In the meanwhile roll out the second piadina and so on.
  9. Serve immediately and don’t cover!

Tip: I have two old nonstick pans that I reserved for this recipe or to roast nuts. I use both at the same time!